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How To Use Basket weave
Stamps For Leather - Part II

By Bob Sherman

In part one of this article I covered the basics of stamping a basket weave pattern. In part two I will discuss how to provide a nice border. As you may have noticed, the basket weave pattern has an irregular border. Because of this a bordering method different from that used for most leather carving is normally used.

Border Method One
This is my preferred method as it provides more definition on the edge and a cleaner appearance in my opinion.


Step 1
Use a swivel knife to cut your border lines - the cut should be approximately halfway through the leather.


Step 2
Use a beveling tool and mallet to bevel the inside of the cut line.

My preferred beveler is one with a crosshatch pattern as shown here, but any pattern standard beveling tool will work.

Note: Do not use a figure beveler or undercut beveler for this.

Strike it with the mallet - your results should be similar to the photo at right.


Step 3
Use a semi circular border tool to stamp around the inside of the cut edge. This will fill in much of the blank space where the basket weave tool did not fit.

Note: It is a very good idea to measure how many impressions will fit before starting. The impressions may be slightly overlapped (as shown to right in photo) or slightly separated (left in photo) as needed to make the border look more uniform.


Border Method 2
I personally do not care for this method, but it is a viable bordering method for those who don't want to or can't use a swivel knife. Since swivel knife usage takes some practice this would be the preferred method when working with groups and children.

The technique is the same so basically these illustrations just show this technique used with various stamping tools.

letter stampIt is a very good idea to measure how many impressions will fit before starting. The impressions may be slightly overlapped (as shown to left in photo) or slightly separated (right in photo) as needed to make the border look more uniform.

Align the tool on border line and hit it with a mallet .


Same thing but with a different stamp style.


Yet another style. Any suitably sized stamp may be used for this technique.


My complete demonstration piece showing all 4 border treatments.


Tips:

Smaller basket weave stamps work better for smaller projects. The stamp used for this small project was a bit too large causing more blank space around the edges.

Small stamps will work fine of large projects, but will take much monger to stamp.

Always use a straight edge when marking your lines.

The alignment of every stamp impression is based on your first two rows - use extra care when stamping these.

Summary
Basket weave patterns are simple to do once the proper technique is learned.


Return To Page 1


Disclaimer: The information presented here is accurate to the best of my knowledge and leather working practices as of the time of this writing - June 2009. The author and the publisher accept no liability for the use or misuse of any of the information presented in this article. This article is presented for informational purposes and is used at your own risk.

Author: Bob Sherman

Publisher: Bobby's Craft Boutique Inc.

This article is provided free of charge for personal use. No portion of this article may be reproduced for publication elsewhere without express permission from Bobby's Craft Boutique Inc. with the following exceptions:

All other requests need to be submitted via our reprint request form.

 

Home > Leather Working Supplies > Leather Working Instructions > How To Stamp Basket weave Patterns in Leather - Part 2

 

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Copyright © 2003 - 2010 Bob Sherman
http://www.onestopcandle.com

 

 


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