Cobwebbed Candle Project

By Bob Sherman

I originally published this project in 1998 and have rewritten and modernized it to fit this site. I named these candles for surface appearance that is common, although varying the dipping temperature will vary the texture. This project is a surface technique and can be used on your own candles or candles that you purchase. The texture is created because a film of wax melts off the candle on its way into the water. This floats and is picked up by the candle on the way out of the water causing a pattern.

Since this project is about a surface technique, it does not cover basic candle making.

Most of the candle making supplies needed can be ordered directly from this page for your convenience.

PLEASE NOTE!! - Candle making can be dangerous if proper safety procedures are not followed. Please read these Safety Rules before attempting any candle making projects.

 

 

 

Candle Making Supplies

The following candle making supplies and other materials were used to make this candle. Clicking on the item name will bring you to that item's page with a full description and ordering information.


Step By Step Instructions

1. Make or purchase some candles. Because we are adding texture, plain candles work best for this. 2. Fill a dipping vat with hot water. This may be heated separately and added, but I find it easier to heat it in the vat using a double boiler setup. My preferred working temperature is 150 degrees F. The texture will vary with temperature, so experiment to find a texture you like.
3. Dip the candle into the hot water and remove. Repeat as necessary. 4. Close up of texture.
5. To bring out the detail I like to rub the candle gently with some Rub n Buff on my fingertip. 6. The finished candle. Unfortunately the overall photo did not come out as well (this was taken before I switched over to a digital camera) but the texture is visible in the previous photos.

Disclaimer: The information presented here is accurate to the best of my knowledge and common candle making practices as of the time of this writing. Originally published in 1998 and updated in April 2006 and June 2011. The author and the publisher accept no liability for the use or misuse of any of the information presented in this article. This article is presented for informational purposes and is used at your own risk.

Author: Bob Sherman

Publisher: Bobby's Craft Boutique Inc.

This article is provided free of charge for use. Candles may be made and sold using this design royalty free, however no portion of this article may be reproduced for publication elsewhere without express permission from Bobby's Craft Boutique Inc. with the following exceptions: